It Can Happen to Anyone How a series of fuel management errors ended in an engine failure for an instructor and a private pilot on final approach at Rockcliffe by Roger M. Delisle “Errare Humanum Est”, as was said nearly 2000 years ago: To err is human. In this edition we look at how this timeless quote does not segregate among pilots. A recent incident at our Flying Club shows us how a chain of insidious events can creep up to catch even a well-intentioned, cautious pilot and an instructor off guard. Thankfully no one was hurt and no damage was incurred in what will surely be an incident the two pilots will not soon forget. In this first of two articles inspired from it,…
Wing Flap Failures by Roger M. Delisle The topic for this issue of the Newsletter is based on an incident which I experienced and would like to share with you, not unlike the first-person accounts of such famous magazine columns as Flying’s “I Learned about Flying from That”, or AOPA Pilot’s “Never Again”. The spirit of these popular regular features, which I highly recommend, is for pilots to put safety before personal pride by sharing their personal experiences with readers so that mistakes shouldn’t needlessly be repeated. Do keep in mind, however, that normally, the Safety Committee keeps the identity of persons involved in an incident completely confidential, so you should feel free to report occurrences without having to turn them into public confessions.
Managing Takeoff Risks by Roger M. Delisle Those few first seconds after the wheels leave the ground is an exhilarating time for many pilots, but they can also be the riskiest of the flight. The 2005 Nall Report shows that in 2004, in nearly 1 out of 5 pilot-related fatal accidents (19.4%), the emergency began during takeoff, before the initial climb. That’s a very short period of time for such a high ratio of mishaps to occur, and it shows how something going wrong like an engine failure when you’re so close to the ground can quickly turn awry. But there’s a catch word in the statistic I quote above: Pilot-related. That is, an accident that arises “from the improper action or inaction of the…
Winter Operations The following article presents some key points outlined in a recent RFC-sponsored Transport Canada seminar by Michel Treskin, Civil Aviation Safety Inspector, on operating aircraft during the winter (as well as some extra points from various sources). Winter flying is safe, but as we all should know, ‘safe’ does not mean ‘risk-free.’ Learn to manage the extra risks of winter flying to fly safely all year round. New to winter ops? Get a “winter operations” briefing at the RFC and consider going up with an instructor, and always consult your A.I.P. Canada publication
Conflict Resolution Within the Circuit The circuit above an airport is designed with the orderly flow of traffic in mind. However, there are always circumstances that can lead to potential conflicts between aircraft within the circuit, and pilots must always be vigilant to be able to detect conflicts early to begin resolving them as soon as possible.
Welcome to the Inaugural Issue! This newsletter is produced by the Rockcliffe Flying Club Safety Committee, a committee formed to promote safe flying practices at the RFC. The newsletter aims to inform you of safety issues in and around Rockcliffe, and to publicise the activities of the Safety Committee, including their investigations of incidents, their findings, and so on. The newsletter is aimed at both the ab initio pilot and the thousand-hour pilot.